Posts Tagged ‘bat survey Macclesfield’

Bat rescue at Mottram St Andrew Primary Academy in Macclesfield

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016
Bat rehomed in a bat box hung in a tree

Bat rehomed in a bat box hung in a tree

I was recently called out to Mottram St Andrew Primary Academy in Macclesfield to rehome a grounded bat found by the school children during their break (initially thought to be a tarantula by the children!).

As per the Bat Conservation Trust guidelines (see below) the bat was safely placed in a box until I arrived:

1. Contain the bat:

a) Like a spider, by placing a box on top of it and sliding a piece of card underneath.

b) Alternatively, cover the bat with a cloth/tea towel and carefully scoop it up and place it in the box.

2. Put a tea towel or soft cloth in the box for the bat to hide in.

3. Put in a small, shallow container e.g. a plastic milk bottle top with a few drops of water (not enough for the bat to drown in). Make sure the water is topped up regularly.

4. Keep the bat indoors somewhere quiet and dark

After inspecting the bat (Myotis sp) to check that it was fit and healthy, it was placed inside a bat box that I hung on a suitable tree within the school grounds.

If you find a bat please follow the above guidelines and contact us on 01565 757788. Further information is available on the BCT website.

Kathryn

UES Senior Ecologist

 

 

Bat and ecological scoping survey in Swindon

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

UES recently completed a bat and ecological scoping survey of a farm in Swindon. Our client has plans to demolish a number of buildings on site and convert other buildings for use as a hotel.

13 buildings were surveyed in total, of which 5 were identified as having high potential for use by bats. Low number of bat droppings believed to be long-eared species Plecotus were found in the internal roof spaces of the farmhouse. UES recommended further surveys on these buildings prior to the start on site to determine how many bats are present and how they are using the buildings.

All bats and their roosts are fully protected by law. Without detailed surveys you are at risk of destroying a bat roost or foraging grounds, which could have devastating consequences for the local bat population, and could land you with a fine or even a jail sentence and some very bad publicity.

During the survey UES recognised that the buildings and trees on site were all suitable for use by roosting and breeding birds, therefore any building works should be carried out outside of the breeding bird season (March to August inclusive) in order that breeding birds are not affected. If this is not possible then either a targeted breeding bird survey should be carried out or an ecological clerk of works appointed.

All breeding birds are protected under schedule 9 of the wildlife and countryside act 1981(as amended). Wild birds are protected from being killed, injured or captured. Their nests are protected from being damaged, destroyed or taken. Several species are included in schedule 1 of the act which gives them and their young protection while nesting.

The presence of protected species is a material consideration when a planning authority is considering a development proposal. The presence of protected species and the effect of the proposed development must be established before planning permission can be granted.

Bat scoping survey in Lancashire

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

UES recently completed a bat scoping survey of a house and associated outbuildings in Lancashire. Our client has plans to demolish a number of buildings onsite and is applying for planning permission for a new build housing scheme.

The aim of the survey was to assess the site for the presence of bat roosts and bat activity within the structure of the buildings. The buildings were searched both externally and internally for bat presence and features associated with bat activity, as detailed in Bat Conservation Trust guidance (2007).

No field signs of bats such as droppings, feeding remains, rubbing or urine stains were found during the building inspections, and as such UES deemed that no further survey work was required in relation to bats.

However, house sparrows were observed breeding inside the building, and therefore mitigation and compensation measures were suggested in relation to breeding birds as ‘The Wildlife and Countryside Act (WCA) 1981’ states that all wild birds are protected. Under the WCA, it is an offence to kill, injure or take any wild bird, to take damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird, or to take or destroy the egg of any wild bird.

Bats and badgers in Buckinghamshire

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

UES conducted a full bat survey of a barn in Marlow, Buckinghamshire in September 2011. Our client plans to change the use of the barn from agricultural to a dwelling.

Low numbers of common species of bats were observed using the area to forage and commute. The species recorded were Common pipistrelle Pipistrellus pipistrellus and Soprano pipistrelle Pipistrellus pygmaeus.

During the course of the survey some evidence of badgers was found including feeding remains and a latrine. A single badger was also observed in a hole on the northwest corner of the barn.

UES are currently completing badger monitoring surveys of the site in Buckinghamshire using remote wildlife cameras. Remote cameras are ideal for badger monitoring surveys allowing you to set it up onsite and return later to collect your images. Remote cameras can be set to take pictures or videos regularly with the time lapse facility, or when it is triggered by an animal moving into the field of view. Either way, it gives a remarkable insight into the wildlife in the vicinity.

Bat survey in Cranage, Cheshire

Monday, August 15th, 2011

Fitting a bat box

UES have completed a bat presence/absence survey at a site in Cheshire. Our client intended to demolish a building and so a bat survey was required in order to inform the planning process.

The building was searched internally and externally for signs of use by bats, and emergence and return roost surveys were carried out. The surveys found bats roosting in the boxed soffits of the building and also under the roof and ridge tiles.

UES recommended that a licensed bat ecologist be present during the demolition in case any bats were found within the building.  During demolition a male pipistrelle was found roosting under the roof tiles and so was carefully rehomed to a new bat box that UES had positioned on site.

UES volunteer for the Bat Conservation Trust (BCT)

Friday, July 15th, 2011

BCT runs a number of national, annual surveys to monitor the status of bats throughout the UK. These surveys form the National Bat Monitoring Programme (NBMP). UES volunteers with around 3000 others to collect essential data on bat populations every year.

UES is currently completing field surveys of 3 sites in Cheshire. Each survey involves walking a triangular route in a randomly allocated 1km square on two evenings in July, to record noctule, serotine, common pipistrelle and soprano pipistrelle bat activity. UES uses several pieces of equipment during a bat survey; bat boxes which can detect the echolocation calls of bats, and the Anabat system which detects bat echolocation calls and displays them visually on a PDA screen which makes recording of the bat calls and identification of the bat species much more accurate.

The NBMP is of great importance as UK bat populations have declined considerably during the past century due to building and development works affecting roosts, and the loss of feeding habitats and flightlines.