Posts Tagged ‘bat survey’

Bat rescue at Mottram St Andrew Primary Academy in Macclesfield

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016
Bat rehomed in a bat box hung in a tree

Bat rehomed in a bat box hung in a tree

I was recently called out to Mottram St Andrew Primary Academy in Macclesfield to rehome a grounded bat found by the school children during their break (initially thought to be a tarantula by the children!).

As per the Bat Conservation Trust guidelines (see below) the bat was safely placed in a box until I arrived:

1. Contain the bat:

a) Like a spider, by placing a box on top of it and sliding a piece of card underneath.

b) Alternatively, cover the bat with a cloth/tea towel and carefully scoop it up and place it in the box.

2. Put a tea towel or soft cloth in the box for the bat to hide in.

3. Put in a small, shallow container e.g. a plastic milk bottle top with a few drops of water (not enough for the bat to drown in). Make sure the water is topped up regularly.

4. Keep the bat indoors somewhere quiet and dark

After inspecting the bat (Myotis sp) to check that it was fit and healthy, it was placed inside a bat box that I hung on a suitable tree within the school grounds.

If you find a bat please follow the above guidelines and contact us on 01565 757788. Further information is available on the BCT website.

Kathryn

UES Senior Ecologist

 

 

Lunar Hornet Clearwing Moth found on a survey in Manchester City Centre

Sunday, July 7th, 2013

The Lunar Hornet Clearwing Sesia bembeciformis, is a more common relative of the Hornet Clearwing Sesia apiformis, both species are in fact moths. They imitate hornets in appearance, flight and they even emit a buzzing sound when flying.

Hornet moths are a fantastic example of what is known as ‘Batesian mimicry’ where harmless species have evolved to imitate more harmful or distasteful species. The idea being that predators are likely to avoid the harmless moth based on a previous unpleasant experience with a hornet or other similar species.

The caterpillars are most often found in willow trunks and can remain in the larval stage for up to two years before emerging as a moth. This photo was taken in Manchester City Centre.

 

Landscape design for bats – advice for developers

Monday, February 25th, 2013

The Bat Conservation Trust  has recently published a new guide: Landscape and Urban Design for Bats and Biodiversity. It presents a range of simple features that a developer, consultant or designer can incorporate into a project with the aim of maximising the biodiversity with a focus on bats.

Modern building designs provide little opportunity for bats, they tend to be well sealed and are generally unsuitable for use by roosting bats. There are a number of features that can be incorporated into buildings that can improve the opportunities for bats while retaining the integrity of the building. Such as Bat Bricks within the building structure or Bat Boxes on surrounding trees.

Some species of bat prefer to roost in trees, finding small crevices, holes or cracks to squeeze in. Planting of appropriate native trees can greatly improve the long term roosting opportunities for local bats and bat boxes provide opportunities in the short term.

Bats are insectivores and landscape design for bat foraging opportunities involves improving the population and variety of nocturnal flying insects. Landscape design focusing on improving opportunities for foraging bats can indirectly improve the local wildlife.

Ideal foraging habitat for bats should include a variety of flowering plants with flowering periods staggered throughout the year. Green roofs seeded with wild flowers are an example of improved foraging opportunities and can also improve the buildings insulation.

The main focus when designing landscapes for commuting bats is appropriate lighting. Most bat species are sensitive to light levels and will avoid well lit areas. The provision of linear features, such as hedgerows, planted trees or dark corridors are ideal.

Landscape design focusing on bats can greatly improve local wildlife and some projects can be awarded credits for ecological features in BREEAM and Code for Sustainable Homes assessment. Careful planning during the design stages can prevent the need for expensive mitigation and survey works further down the line.

UES Ltd has several years’ experience in ecological project management and has guided many large capital infra-structure schemes. UES Ltd is an expert in Landscape design focusing on protected species and ecological features.

Bats and development in Avon

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Bats will utilise any available opportunities

Many people in the UK share their buildings with bats and are unaware. As a result when Local Planning Authorities refuse planning permission in relation to bats home owners and developers can be surprised. However with the correct ecology surveys, appropriate planning and ecological advice from bat experts development can proceed.

Local Planning Authorities will refuse planning permission if they believe that bats may be affected. This can occur on projects of any size from a loft conversion to a major infrastructure development.

In some situations a bat survey such as a bat scoping survey will be sufficient to confirm the absence of bats.  A bat scoping survey can be carried out at any time of year and can inform a prospective developer of any issues that may arise. Early recognition of bat presence and appropriate planning can remove the need for further survey works.

If bat presence is likely then a bat presence/absence survey may be required, construction can be postponed and planning permission will be refused until the necessary surveys are completed. These bat surveys can only be carried out within a specific window of 6 months across spring and summer. If evidence of significant bat presence is found you may be required to obtain a European Protected Species Licence from Natural England.

UES is an experienced ecological consultancy and has been providing ecological advice and services for several years throughout the UK. UES has worked on a variety of projects where bats are present, and is experienced in obtaining European Protected Species Licences for various types of development. UES is aware that delaying projects has major financial consequences and works hard to try and prevent any issues that could cause delay.

Bats and development in Bedfordshire

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Bats will utilise any available opportunities

Many people in the UK share their buildings with bats and are unaware. As a result when Local Planning Authorities refuse planning permission in relation to bats home owners and developers can be surprised. However with the correct ecology surveys, appropriate planning and ecological advice from bat experts development can proceed.

Local Planning Authorities will refuse planning permission if they believe that bats may be affected. This can occur on projects of any size from a loft conversion to a major infrastructure development.

In some situations a bat survey such as a bat scoping survey will be sufficient to confirm the absence of bats.  A bat scoping survey can be carried out at any time of year and can inform a prospective developer of any issues that may arise. Early recognition of bat presence and appropriate planning can remove the need for further survey works.

If bat presence is likely then a bat presence/absence survey may be required, construction can be postponed and planning permission will be refused until the necessary surveys are completed. These bat surveys can only be carried out within a specific window of 6 months across spring and summer. If evidence of significant bat presence is found you may be required to obtain a European Protected Species Licence from Natural England.

UES is an experienced ecological consultancy and has been providing ecological advice and services for several years throughout the UK. UES has worked on a variety of projects where bats are present, and is experienced in obtaining European Protected Species Licences for various types of development. UES is aware that delaying projects has major financial consequences and works hard to try and prevent any issues that could cause delay.

Bats and development in Berkshire

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Bats will utilise any available opportunities

Many people in the UK share their buildings with bats and are unaware. As a result when Local Planning Authorities refuse planning permission in relation to bats home owners and developers can be surprised. However with the correct ecology surveys, appropriate planning and ecological advice from bat experts development can proceed.

Local Planning Authorities will refuse planning permission if they believe that bats may be affected. This can occur on projects of any size from a loft conversion to a major infrastructure development.

In some situations a bat survey such as a bat scoping survey will be sufficient to confirm the absence of bats.  A bat scoping survey can be carried out at any time of year and can inform a prospective developer of any issues that may arise. Early recognition of bat presence and appropriate planning can remove the need for further survey works.

If bat presence is likely then a bat presence/absence survey may be required, construction can be postponed and planning permission will be refused until the necessary surveys are completed. These bat surveys can only be carried out within a specific window of 6 months across spring and summer. If evidence of significant bat presence is found you may be required to obtain a European Protected Species Licence from Natural England.

UES is an experienced ecological consultancy and has been providing ecological advice and services for several years throughout the UK. UES has worked on a variety of projects where bats are present, and is experienced in obtaining European Protected Species Licences for various types of development. UES is aware that delaying projects has major financial consequences and works hard to try and prevent any issues that could cause delay.

Bats and development in Bristol

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Bats will utilise any available opportunities

Many people in the UK share their buildings with bats and are unaware. As a result when Local Planning Authorities refuse planning permission in relation to bats home owners and developers can be surprised. However with the correct ecology surveys, appropriate planning and ecological advice from bat experts development can proceed.

Local Planning Authorities will refuse planning permission if they believe that bats may be affected. This can occur on projects of any size from a loft conversion to a major infrastructure development.

In some situations a bat survey such as a bat scoping survey will be sufficient to confirm the absence of bats.  A bat scoping survey can be carried out at any time of year and can inform a prospective developer of any issues that may arise. Early recognition of bat presence and appropriate planning can remove the need for further survey works.

If bat presence is likely then a bat presence/absence survey may be required, construction can be postponed and planning permission will be refused until the necessary surveys are completed. These bat surveys can only be carried out within a specific window of 6 months across spring and summer. If evidence of significant bat presence is found you may be required to obtain a European Protected Species Licence from Natural England.

UES is an experienced ecological consultancy and has been providing ecological advice and services for several years throughout the UK. UES has worked on a variety of projects where bats are present, and is experienced in obtaining European Protected Species Licences for various types of development. UES is aware that delaying projects has major financial consequences and works hard to try and prevent any issues that could cause delay.

Bats and development in Buckinghamshire

Monday, February 25th, 2013
Common pipistrelle

Common pipistrelle

Many people in the UK share their buildings with bats and are unaware. As a result when Local Planning Authorities refuse planning permission in relation to bats home owners and developers can be surprised. However with the correct ecology surveys, appropriate planning and ecological advice from bat experts development can proceed.

Local Planning Authorities will refuse planning permission if they believe that bats may be affected. This can occur on projects of any size from a loft conversion to a major infrastructure development.

In some situations a bat survey such as a bat scoping survey will be sufficient to confirm the absence of bats.  A bat scoping survey can be carried out at any time of year and can inform a prospective developer of any issues that may arise. Early recognition of bat presence and appropriate planning can remove the need for further survey works.

If bat presence is likely then a bat presence/absence survey may be required, construction can be postponed and planning permission will be refused until the necessary surveys are completed. These bat surveys can only be carried out within a specific window of 6 months across spring and summer. If evidence of significant bat presence is found you may be required to obtain a European Protected Species Licence from Natural England.

UES is an experienced ecological consultancy and has been providing ecological advice and services for several years throughout the UK. UES has worked on a variety of projects where bats are present, and is experienced in obtaining European Protected Species Licences for various types of development. UES is aware that delaying projects has major financial consequences and works hard to try and prevent any issues that could cause delay.

Bats and development in Cambridgeshire

Monday, February 25th, 2013
Common pipistrelle

Common pipistrelle, the most common UK bat

Many people in the UK share their buildings with bats and are unaware. As a result when Local Planning Authorities refuse planning permission in relation to bats home owners and developers can be surprised. However with the correct ecology surveys, appropriate planning and ecological advice from bat experts development can proceed.

Local Planning Authorities will refuse planning permission if they believe that bats may be affected. This can occur on projects of any size from a loft conversion to a major infrastructure development.

In some situations a bat survey such as a bat scoping survey will be sufficient to confirm the absence of bats.  A bat scoping survey can be carried out at any time of year and can inform a prospective developer of any issues that may arise. Early recognition of bat presence and appropriate planning can remove the need for further survey works.

If bat presence is likely then a bat presence/absence survey may be required, construction can be postponed and planning permission will be refused until the necessary surveys are completed. These bat surveys can only be carried out within a specific window of 6 months across spring and summer. If evidence of significant bat presence is found you may be required to obtain a European Protected Species Licence from Natural England.

UES is an experienced ecological consultancy and has been providing ecological advice and services for several years throughout the UK. UES has worked on a variety of projects where bats are present, and is experienced in obtaining European Protected Species Licences for various types of development. UES is aware that delaying projects has major financial consequences and works hard to try and prevent any issues that could cause delay.

Bats and development in Cheshire

Monday, February 25th, 2013
Common pipistrelle

Common pipistrelle, the most common UK bat

Many people in the UK share their buildings with bats and are unaware. As a result when Local Planning Authorities refuse planning permission in relation to bats home owners and developers can be surprised. However with the correct ecology surveys, appropriate planning and ecological advice from bat experts development can proceed.

Local Planning Authorities will refuse planning permission if they believe that bats may be affected. This can occur on projects of any size from a loft conversion to a major infrastructure development.

In some situations a bat survey such as a bat scoping survey will be sufficient to confirm the absence of bats.  A bat scoping survey can be carried out at any time of year and can inform a prospective developer of any issues that may arise. Early recognition of bat presence and appropriate planning can remove the need for further survey works.

If bat presence is likely then a bat presence/absence survey may be required, construction can be postponed and planning permission will be refused until the necessary surveys are completed. These bat surveys can only be carried out within a specific window of 6 months across spring and summer. If evidence of significant bat presence is found you may be required to obtain a European Protected Species Licence from Natural England.

UES is an experienced ecological consultancy and has been providing ecological advice and services for several years throughout the UK. UES has worked on a variety of projects where bats are present, and is experienced in obtaining European Protected Species Licences for various types of development. UES is aware that delaying projects has major financial consequences and works hard to try and prevent any issues that could cause delay.